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African Solutions

SKU: V6325
This volume is a result of research into the policies, programmes and experiences identified as best practices in the Country Review Reports (CRRs) of twelve countries published under the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), from Algeria, Benin, Burkina

Afro-pessimism typically stems from the old racist canard that Africans are unable to govern themselves. If any proof of this pernicious fallacy were still needed, the positive developments in African governance over the past two decades would provide it.” – Hazel McFerson, African Studies Review

This volume is a result of research into the policies, programmes and experiences identified as best practices in the Country Review Reports (CRRs) of twelve countries published under the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), from Algeria, Benin, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Mali, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa and Uganda. The research was commissioned and coordinated by the Governance and APRM Programme of the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA).

To justify this inquiry, they argued, among others, that with the APRM conceived a voluntary mechanism, and in the absence of ‘hard pressure’ for compliance, incentives –rather than sanctions – could be the way to strengthen the APRM. Thus the importance of best practices: as templates and models for reform, and as a counterbalance to the temptation to concentrate on what is not working in Africa.

In this book, therefore, best practices identified in the twelve CRRs are examined critically and methodically with a view to understanding:

  1. how they are conceptualised within the APRM (including their definition and how they are intended to be used to achieve the desired results);
  2. how the items reported as best practices qualify to be regarded as such in the sense of being demonstrably better than the rest, replicable and addressing APRM goals; and

iii) how they can be strengthened for use as material from peer learning within the APRM and around the continent.

The authors are drawn from academia and policy research institutions in Africa, and have been associated with the APRM in various capacities since its inception, including direct research for APRM country self-assessment, membership in APRM Country Review Missions and acting as consultants and specialists for the APRM’s Continental Secretariat.

About the Editors
Tšoeu Petlane
is Deputy Programme Head for Governance and the APRM at the South African Institute of International Affairs in Johannesburg. He was previously Research Fellow and Head of Research at the Institute of Southern African Studies, National University of Lesotho, where he led the Lesotho country self-assessment exercise as Research Coordination for the ISAS-LIPAM Research Consortium that was contracted by the Lesotho APRM National Governing Council.

Steven Gruzd is the former head of the Governance and African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) Programme at the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA). He joined SAIIA’s Nepad and Governance Project in April 2003, serving as research manager, and he was subsequently appointed head in 2008. He holds an MSc in International Relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science. He co-authored The African Peer Review Mechanism: Lessons from the Pioneers with Ross Herbert in 2008, and is the co-editor of Grappling with Governance: Perspectives on the African Peer Review Mechanism (Fanele, 2010).

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Parameters of Book: Book
Sub-title: Best Practices from the African Peer Review Mechanism
Author: Edited by Tšoeu Petlane and Steve Gruzd
ISBN: 9781920196325
d-PDF ISBN: 9781920196448
Size (mm): 235x155mm
Pages: 160pp
format: Paperback
Colour: Black & White
Rights: World
Language: English
Publication Date: 2011-10-03